My Dunedin Itinerary

30 Words

Majestic Victorian and Edwardian architecture, a proximity to an abundance of spectacular wildlife and a lively youth culture make for a fascinating and exciting melange in this eminently human-sized city.

50 Words - wildlife

The very Scottish city of Dunedin is affectionately known as “the Edinburgh of the south.”

Dunedin is renowned for its abundance of Victorian and Edwardian architecture, as well as its proximity to rare wildlife, including the only mainland breeding colony in the world of Albatross, and the rare Yellow Eyed Penguin.

50 words

Dunedin is famous for wildlife, its Scottish, educational and architectural heritage. Dunedin is sheltered by the Otago Peninsula, home to the world’s only mainland breeding colony of Albatross and rare Yellow Eyed Penguins. Dunedin’s vibrant culture is reflected in an array of cafés, antique stores, boutique fashion designers and jewellers.

73 Words

Dunedin is an historic university city that stretches around a beautiful harbour. On the Otago Peninsula, tour Larnach Castle before visiting the world’s only mainland breeding colony of albatross and then see one of the world’s rarest penguins in its natural habitat.

Exquisite examples of Victorian and Edwardian architecture punctuate a compact cityscape with a vibrant culture; reflected in an eclectic array of kerbside cafés, antique stores and boutique fashion designers and jewellers.

82 Words

Dunedin is a charming historic city of Scottish influence which is most well known for its world class wildlife colonies and its Victorian and Edwardian architecture but is also a city with many other hidden charms.

Explore the city on a historic double-decker bus, take a harbour cruise to see fur seals, the magnificent Royal Albatross, the rare Yellow Eyed Penguins and other birds, visit New Zealand’s only castle, or relax and enjoy the scenery on board the historic Taieri Gorge Railway.

96 Words

Dunedin is an historic university city that stretches around a long and beautiful harbour sheltered by the stunning Otago Peninsula. Natural wonders abound on the Otago Peninsula, home to a colony of one of the world’s rarest penguins, the only mainland breeding colony of albatross, rare New Zealand sea lions and the magnificent Larnach Castle.

Exquisite examples of Victorian and Edwardian architecture punctuate a compact cityscape with a vibrant culture; reflected in an eclectic array of kerbside cafés, antique stores and boutique fashion designers and jewellers.

A world of fantastic recreational opportunities awaits you in Dunedin.

100 words

Dunedin is a historic university city that stretches around a long and beautiful harbour sheltered by the stunning Otago Peninsula.

Natural wonders abound on the Otago Peninsula, home to a colony of one of the world’s rarest penguins, the only mainland breeding colony of albatross, rare New Zealand sea lions, charming villages and bays and the magnificent Larnach Castle.

Exquisite examples of Victorian and Edwardian architecture punctuate a compact cityscape with a vibrant culture; reflected in an eclectic array of kerbside cafés, antique stores and boutique fashion designers and jewellers.

A world of fantastic recreational opportunities awaits you in Dunedin.

137 Words

Dunedin is an historic university city that stretches around a long and beautiful harbour sheltered by the stunning Otago Peninsula. Natural wonders abound on the Otago Peninsula, home to a colony of one of the world’s rarest penguins, the only mainland breeding colony of albatross, rare New Zealand sea lions and the magnificent Larnach Castle.

Exquisite examples of Victorian and Edwardian architecture punctuate a compact cityscape with a vibrant culture; reflected in an eclectic array of kerbside cafés, antique stores and boutique fashion designers and jewellers.

The seaside settlements of Karitane and Port Chalmers provide the perfect setting to escape the city for the day or visit the haunting rocky tors and tussock of Middlemarch, our hinterland and the starting point for the Otago Central Rail Trail. A world of fantastic recreational opportunities awaits you in Dunedin.

182 words

Dunedin, New Zealand’s first city is set amidst a magical landscape edged by the sea. Here the streets hum vibrantly with colour and culture, and the beauty of nature can still be found - everywhere. It is a thriving city of rare charm.

An historic university town, Dunedin spreads around a sheltered harbour. The city is regarded as having the finest examples of Victorian and Edwardian architecture in the Southern Hemisphere. Spires and towers of notable neo-Gothic buildings and stately homes punctuate Dunedin’s cityscape. The city centre is compact, with a wonderful array of kerbside cafés, high quality local craft, art, jewellery and fashion design outlets.

As New Zealand’s eco-tourism capital, the city is renowned for its proximity to incredible wildlife. The Otago Peninsula, a brief drive from the city centre, is home to a colony of the world’s rarest penguins, the only mainland breeding colony of the royal albatross, rare New Zealand sea lions and the magnificent Larnach Castle. A world of recreational opportunities awaits the active at heart.

Visit to experience the southern hospitality that is unique to Dunedin.

209 Words

Majestic Victorian and Edwardian architecture, a proximity to an abundance of spectacular wildlife and a lively youth culture make for a fascinating and exciting melange in this eminently human-sized city.

The city of Dunedin is framed by a magnificent harbour, long and picturesque. It sits on the doorstep of Otago Peninsula, which has long been acclaimed for its beauty and wildlife. The Otago Peninsula boasts the world’s only mainland breeding colony of the Albatross as well as fantastic viewing of the rare Yellow-Eyed Penguin, New Zealand Fur Seals and other ocean birds and mammals in their natural habitat.

The city is a picture postcard of historic buildings and houses, set against a backdrop of the city’s lush greenbelt of native bush. Fondly known as the ‘Edinburgh of the South,’ Dunedin celebrates its Scottish ancestry and treasures its icons.

Dunedin is widely regarded as the best preserved Victorian and Edwardian heritage city in the southern hemisphere, boasting many historical masterpieces. The University of Otago – NZ’s oldest university and home to Dunedin’s large and lively student population – boasts 130 year old blue stone buildings equal to those seen at Oxford or Cambridge.

There are kilometres of breathtaking panoramas, as well as stunning little ‘secret places’…Dunedin offers much to stir the senses.

466 Words

Dunedin, located on the south east coast of New Zealand’s South Island, is New Zealand’s first city. Named after its sister city, Dunedin is the celtic name for Edinburgh.  It the second largest city in the South Island and is one of New Zealand’s most important educational and cultural centres. 

 A remarkable destination of stunning natural beauty overlaid with a fascinating cultural history, Dunedin is rich with elegant historic architecture, this region is the perfect place to explore New Zealand's colourful heritage, experience the city’s vibrant modern culture, and world-renowned wildlife adventures in a stunningly rugged landscape.

Known for its creativity and vibrant atmosphere, Dunedin offers a host of amazing experiences this winter.  Remarkable performances, exhibitions and festivals will be running throughout the winter with many opportunities to feed your mind and your soul in Dunedin’s distinctive galleries, museums and theatres. 

The Otago Peninsula is home to an abundance of wildlife unique to the region including species usually found in remote southern ocean environments including Royal albatross, yellow-eyed penguins, blue penguins, sea lions and fur seals.

Dunedin is known for its culinary experiences. Award winning restaurants serve up fresh local seafood and delicacies, quirky bars are found in intriguing alleyways, cafes filled with coffee purists and connoisseurs and an entertainment precinct that thrives on the vibrancy, brought about by being a University City.

If shopping is high on the agenda for your holiday, Dunedin is renowned for its vast selection of fine antique stores, retro rummaging shops and stylish vintage fashion boutiques.  Hunt out exquisite treasures from Port Chalmers to Broad Bay, and then lose yourself in the central city’s many gorgeous emporiums. A cornucopia of local and international, contemporary brands from the High Street, await discovery in the city centre.  Head to the Wall Street Mall, then further explore George Street and its fabulous retail havens.

Well-known for its distinctive design community, Dunedin is home to many unique design stores specialising in fashion, jewellery, homewares and art created by local, national and international artisans. A little exploring will reward you with hidden delights in the city’s eclectic boutiques.

Dunedin’s Scottish history is brushed with cosmopolitan charm, boasting the largest concentration of Victorian and Edwardian architecture in New Zealand. From the iconic Larnach Castle to the various churches in the city, there are fine examples of heritage architecture around every corner. The Flemish-renaissance style Dunedin Railway Station is one of the grandest stations in the world and it is said to be the most photographed building in New Zealand. The University of Otago, New Zealand’s first university, with its distinctive clock tower is a perfect example of how the old has been blended superbly with the new. Add to this the abundance of grand old houses and you really do have a city of historic significance.

728 Words

It’s hard to imagine that one destination can have some of the best wildlife viewing in the world, an impressive array of heritage architecture and home to world class fashion designers. But there is such a destination, Dunedin.

The Otago Peninsula stretches along the southern edge of Dunedin’s harbour. On the Peninsula, within sight of the cityscape, is home to the only mainland breeding colony of the Royal Albatross. The observatory at Taiaora Head Royal Albatross Centre provides a unique opportunity to view the albatross in their natural environment. Depending on what time of the year you visit, you could be privileged enough to view chicks being fussed over by devoted parents, adolescents partying, just like adolescents do everywhere, or courtships with lots of necking and canoodling by courting couples.

Underneath the Albatross Centre lies the tunnels of Fort Taiaroa, established over 100 years ago to counter the threat of invasion from Russia. The Observation Post overlooks part of the albatross colony, and the fort is now a museum.  Visitors are fortunate to view the only Armstrong Disappearing Gun of its type in the world, still in its original gun pit.

Adding to a unique wildlife experience, the Otago Peninsula is also home to the world’s rarest penguin the Yellow-eyed Penguin or Hoiho its Maori name, which means noise shouter and is unique to the South Island. The Yellow-eyed Penguin Conservation Reserve, “Penguin Place”, has a unique set of tunnels, hides and tracks set up to view these fascinating creatures as they go about their everyday life. The conservation project began in 1984 with just 8 breeding pairs of Yellow-eyed Penguins; the “Penguin Place” also houses a penguin hospital.

Natures Wonders, situated at the head of Otago Peninsula, adds a little adventure to your wildlife experience. Take a personalised tour climbing to 201 metres above sea level on an 8 wheel drive Argo where you will see some amazing wildlife and stunning views. This is a working farm and a wonderful wildlife area which is owned and operated by the Reid family. Local character Perry “Dundee” Reid and his family will provide you with an interesting and informative commentary on the wildlife and points of interest on this stunning property.

Dunedin boasts the largest concentration of Victorian and Edwardian architecture in New Zealand. From the iconic Larnach Castle to the various churches in the city, there are fine examples of heritage architecture around every corner. The Flemish-renaissance style Dunedin Railway Station is one of the grandest stations in the world and it is said to be the most photographed building in New Zealand. The University of Otago, New Zealand’s first university, with its distinctive clock tower is a perfect example of how the old has been blended superbly with the new. Add to this the abundance of grand old houses and you really do have a city of historic significance.  

Larnach Castle, New Zealand’s only castle, was the dream of William Larnach who was a merchant baron, banker and prominent politician. Construction began in 1871 and it took three years to build the shell and a further twelve years for craftsmen to embellish the interior. With scandalous, tragic history and fantastic garden setting Larnach Castle is a true icon. Margaret Barker purchased the castle in 1967 and with the help of her family fully restored the castle and its grounds, making it the iconic visitor’s destination that it is today; the gardens have been rated as a Garden of International Significance.

The Dunedin fashion scene has become increasingly apparent in recent years. iD Dunedin Fashion Week in March, continues to grow and is now an established event on New Zealand’s style calendar. With worldwide media attention, iD Dunedin Fashion Week provides great exposure for local designers. World class brands such as Carlson, NOM*D and Mild Red have created a benchmark for Dunedin fashion with many young aspiring designers using Dunedin as their base for their journey on the road to fashion success. A fresh and exciting fashion community is flourishing in Dunedin and designer boutiques and studios are constantly opening throughout the city.Dunedin is a vibrant city with world class wildlife viewing right on its back door step. The architectural heritage is unparalleled in New Zealand and with its stylish fashion industry and café culture, Dunedin is a city that has to be added to every itinerary.